Common Concerns / Questions

The information contained on this site is solely for general information and educational purposes.

Users of this site agree do not hold Suzanne More Kerr, MA (PSYCY), CCC responsible for their own actions or for issues, concerns, and decisions regarding oneself and others that the User may make based on the contents of this site today or in the future. The User is aware that advice and suggestions made within are not specific to his or her personal situation.

1. What are you like as a therapist?
My personal style is warm, accepting, supportive, and nonjudgmental.

In order to assist the process of a healing dialogue, the therapeutic method will reflect each person’s individual temperament and experiences and can vary depending on what an individual is struggling with and what he or she is comfortable with.

Different instances call for listening to a person’s story, or offering guidance, or providing insight.

While I can be a very active therapist—asking you questions as we talk and sharing my own ideas, thoughts, and reactions as I experience them in our session—often I will want to listen silently to you as you process your concerns aloud.

At appropriate times I will challenge you if I feel you are stuck or could benefit from a different perspective or point of view.

Once a collaboratively planned treatment is begun, you and myself will thereafter look at the value of each session in light of what has already transpired. I encourage you to tell me how each session has gone for you and you are always free to question or to clarify any ideas that I express in your therapy.

2. What is the first session like?
The first session is a Consultation Session. You can tell me about the problem you are having in your life, and I will ask you any number of questions so that I feel sure that I have a clear understanding of what it is you're dealing with.

At the end of the session I'll give you feedback and make recommendations on how we can begin to focus therapy to address the problem you have having.

You are then free to decide if you'd like to embark on a course of therapy or to take some time to consider whether therapy is right for you at this time.

Once you begin therapy, we will together formulate a map of treatment during the early stages of treatment.

3. How long will it take me to get an appointment with you?
Not long. I will ordinarily return your phone call within 1 business day. I make it a priority to see all new clients as soon as possible, usually within a week or two.

4. What will be required of me in therapy?

In order for you to have a successful therapy experience, you will need to be ready to:

  • Budget for the cost of your therapy
  • Clear space in your work and personal schedule to come to therapy appointments
  • Describe in detail the problem or problems you are having
  • Be willing to talk about your family relationships and childhood history
  • Consider and/or answer probative questions that I will pose to enable you to think about different dimensions of your problem
  • Be open to thinking about your problem in a new and different way
  • Be open to trying new approaches or strategies to deal with your problem

5. How long will I need to be in therapy?
That depends. Some issues are able to be resolved in a short-term therapy (3 to 6 months) while other issues simply take more time (6 months to a year or more).

Many clients choose to work with me for a period of time on a specific goal until it is resolved, then come back at a later time to work on a different goal or problem in their life.

I am happy to give you feedback about how long a therapy will likely be necessary for you to meet your goals or resolve your problem.
This having been said, I would like you to feel free to end therapy in your own time and in your own way. I prefer to provide you all the time you need in order to give you an environment that is therapeutic, safe, and facilitates development.

I believe the question of ending should remain in your hands to be raised when you choose. Ideally, this subject should be addressed only as it emerges in the your sessions to be reflected upon and examined when it arises. As the decision (the power) to enter therapy rests completely in your hands, so should the decision to exit.

6. How often should I come to therapy?
To get the most out of therapy you should plan on coming once a week or once every two weeks.

7. What therapy approaches do you use?
I have been educated in a variety of different therapeutic approaches for both Individual Counselling and Therapy and couple and family counselling therapy.

I have trained with leaders in the field here in Canada and in the U.S. I use a combination of current, cutting-edge approaches as well as the tried-and-true traditional therapies. I am well grounded in and use only professionally accepted approaches that research has shown to be effective.

My approaches include psychodynamic models, specifically object-relations, family-of-origin, attachment, and experiential therapies, as well as emotionally-focused and family systems therapies. I also employ the cognitive-behaviouraal and solution focused models.

Further, I offer Eye Movement Desensitizing Reprocessing (EMDR). .  

After the Consultation session, I will pick and choose from among these therapies to create a tailor-made therapy just for you.

Because every individual and every couple is unique, I find that this is the best way to maximize the effectiveness of therapy for my clients.

Most importantly, psychotherapists are ordinary human beings that have had some special training in how to be helpful. They have their own unique personality and characteristics. For this reason it is important that the “fit” between client and therapist is comfortable such that there is a mutuality of influence between client and therapist (that is, A influencing B, B influencing A, and so forth).

8. How will I know when the therapy is working?
You'll notice. You will feel the effects of the changes you make. In addition, we'll discuss the progress you are making as we go along so that at any given point you will know what you have accomplished and what work remains to be done to meet your goals. When the therapy is working you may begin to:

  • Feel happier and more confident
  • Experience more satisfying interactions in your relationships
  • Do things that you might not have thought yourself capable of
  • Stand up for yourself in a difficult relationship in a way that feels good to you
  • Feel more in control in your life
  • Experience surprising, positive responses from the people around you

 

Terms of Use:
The information contained on this site is solely for general information and educational purposes.

Users of this site agree to not hold Suzanne More Kerr, MA (PSYCY), CCC responsible for their own actions or for issues, concerns, and decisions regarding oneself and others that the User may make based on the contents of this site today or in the future. The User is aware that advice and suggestions made within are not specific to his or her personal situation.